peeing-while-running:

Flanagan coming up Heartbreak Hill

peeing-while-running:

Flanagan coming up Heartbreak Hill

(via silverliningrunner)




wholeandhealthy:

Vanilla Chia porridge topped with banana slices, warmed berry compote, more chia and roasted pumpkin seeds 💕 #meals

wholeandhealthy:

Vanilla Chia porridge topped with banana slices, warmed berry compote, more chia and roasted pumpkin seeds 💕 #meals

(via pbpancake)




iloveyourstride:

You can drop that thun thun thun all you want as long as you don’t drop that baton.

(via runjenrun22)




 heavenshighs asked: "Hey! I'm a runner for my schools cross country and track team and if it's alright I have two questions! 1.) what would you suggest as a good diet for a runner? 2.) I slacked off a lot this year but I'm always able to bounce back faster than expected. How can I work myself into good shape fast again but without injury?"

Hi there!

1) Make sure you eat a lot of iron and calcium and just try to eat healthy as often as you possibly can.  It’s ok to have some treats (everyone needs them sometimes), just don’t eat tons of junk food every day!  I try to eat veggies and fruits as often as possible (and I obviously eat tons of carbs and protein) and drink at least 2L of water per day.  I also don’t drink soda or eat desserts, chips, etc., but that doesn’t mean you can’t do either you those things (everyone is different).

2) Strength train, strength train, strength train!  That and stretching are the only ways to prevent injury.  I do a ton of core, upper body, and leg stuff (usually bicep curls, pushups, a ton of ab exercises, squats, hamstring curls with a bosu ball, wall-sits, heel walking, and shoulder presses).  Also make sure to stretch DIRECTLY after every run (I’d also recommend rolling with a foam roller or a stick roller—it really helps) and ice any areas that hurt for 15 minutes right after you stretch.  If you do those things, you should be good.  Also, make sure that you don’t increase your mileage by over 10% each week!  Good luck :)




sixsecondshigh:

A great photo of Meb from the Boston Globe.

sixsecondshigh:

A great photo of Meb from the Boston Globe.

(via bathtubradio)




nolimits-xctf:

dirttrailsandsideponytales:

running4thehigh:

Boston Marathon Champion: Meb Keflezighi.

USA USA USA

^

nolimits-xctf:

dirttrailsandsideponytales:

running4thehigh:

Boston Marathon Champion: Meb Keflezighi.

USA USA USA

^




Hi guys! I’m so tired I’m practically falling asleep as I write this so I’ll keep it brief and write a longer post tomorrow!
So before the 3000, my coach told me to treat is as more of a workout than a race because there wasn’t any competition. So I ended up running 10:50 and lapping the entire field. It felt like a tempo, though, which is good, so if I ever run it again, I know that I can go a lot faster!

PS—I promise I’ll answer all of your asks tomorrow, so sorry for the delay! :(



I made leaf-printed Easter eggs!  I can’t believe I didn’t mess them up…

I made leaf-printed Easter eggs! I can’t believe I didn’t mess them up…




 Anonymous asked: "Do you have any tips on how to start contacting colleges for running? I'm totally lost and have no idea what to do. I'm also a junior and my times are not up to par for running in college yet, but I'm focusing on improving my times drastically by senior year. Would that be too late to start contacting colleges? Thanks."

Senior year is unfortunately too late if you want to be a recruit. At the latest, you should start contacting colleges around the early summer before your senior year. In terms of specifics, I’d suggest you ask a guidance counsellor or someone who’s a recruiting expert, because I can’t help you more unless I know your exact situation (if you want, though, feel free to message me off anon and I’ll see what I can do to help). However, I can say that it’s never a bad idea to fill out recruiting questionnaires on teams’ websites! I also send coaches personal emails with all of my information and tell them when I’m visiting. Good luck!




 Anonymous asked: "I did read that whole post... And wow. You just showed me everything that is holding me back right now, and I can only thank you for that. And now that you've realized that for yourself... It's time to kick ass. You can do this, Nina. You said it yourself - you are ready! 💚💚💚"

Thank you—this really means a lot. 😊




 Anonymous asked: "you're so inspirational!!"

❤ wow, thanks so much!





sometimes, you gotta remind yourself how far you’ve come 

As I’m getting ready for my first-ever 3000 on Monday, I’m feeling a little nervous.  Then I realized…Guys.  I’ve come so far.

In freshman year, I joined cross country because my sister ran in high school.  I wasn’t that into it—I hated running, honestly.  I was lazy and didn’t want to work hard.  I ran a PR of 22:28 in the 5K and 18:29 in the 4K, and that was pretty much that.  I joined track (because everyone else who ran XC was doing it) and I ran a 5:45 in the 1500.  I trained with the team, of course, but I never put in any extra work.  Then I got a stress fracture and I pretty much gave up.  “Who cares?” I thought.  “I’m never going to be any good, obviously.”

Then came sophomore year.  Having healed from my stress fracture, I really wanted to run well in XC.  I was still pretty lazy that summer, though—I still couldn’t really commit myself to it.  I improved a decent amount, running 21:03 in the 5K and 17:30 in the 4K, but I struggled with tons of injuries and still couldn’t bring myself to commit to a sport I didn’t really like.

That winter, I decided to try to improve.  I started training more and I went to the Armory twice a week.  Even so, I often skipped out on my workouts or shortened them because I didn’t feel like finishing them.  I (quite literally) never went the extra mile.  My stupid training landed me with another stress fracture (or was it a stress reaction?  They all blend together.) right before outdoor.  That was when I started to realize how much track mattered to me.  I had dreams of qualifying for nationals.  I wanted to do whatever it took.

That was when, of course, I got another injury, and any chances of running the times I wanted to were gone.  I ended up running a 5:10 1500 and a 2:35 800, but that was nowhere close to my goal.  I watched people around me run 5:00s and 4:50s and even 4:45s as I struggled to train without getting hurt and just finish my races.  It goes without saying that track ended on a pretty sour note for me.

After I was healed, that summer, I knew that junior year was my last chance.  So I trained at altitude in Perú and busted my butt for XC.  I didn’t just do the workouts my coach gave us—I did more.  I wanted it, as I always had, but this time wasn’t like before, because this time I was willing to work for it.  I made it through XC without an injury and I ran 15:59 in the 4K and 19:27 in the 5K!  I never made my goal of breaking 19 in the 5K, but I knew that there would be other opportunities and other seasons.

During indoor, I just went crazy.  Every night, I would lie awake thinking about college recruiting and state rankings and the girls who were faster than me.  I set big goals, especially for my 1500 time.  I wanted it so badly.  I didn’t skip or shorten any workouts.  I gave 100%.  I definitely improved—I ran a 5:05 1500, a 3:10 1000, and a 2:25 800—but I was still so far from my goals.  A 4:40 1500?  Forget it.  What was worse was that every time I raced, my anxiety prevented me from running fast times.  I would step on the starting line shaking and about to puke.  My amazing teammate and winter racing partner would always try to calm me down, but nothing helped.  I ruined race after race because I was too scared.  Ironically, I was holding myself back when all I wanted to do was improve.  I started outdoor simultaneously hopeful for improvement and panicked about being so far from my goals.

So now, I’m here.  Still 14 seconds from my ultimate goal in the 1500 (I ran 4:54 last week).  I don’t know if I’ll ever make 4:40 this season, but I definitely want 4:45 or at least sub-4:50.  Throughout my entire high school career up to this point, I never believed in myself—that’s why I was so scared to race this winter.  But recently, somehow, I’ve found that belief and that courage that I lacked before.  I’m not scared to race anymore.  I know that I’m giving 100% in training, and when I step onto the line, I don’t think of the pain I’m about to endure.  I think of the feeling at the finish line that I’ll get when I achieve my goal.  That’s what we all run for, right?  That feeling of achieving a goal?  It’s the greatest feeling in the world.  And that’s why I’m going to run my hardest for 10 or so minutes in the 3000 this Monday: because no pain or fear can distract me from that feeling at the finish.  I won’t let fear decide my fate anymore.




trinalesins:

FOCUS.

this is such a cool pic

trinalesins:

FOCUS.

this is such a cool pic

(via a-runnersdream)




 Anonymous asked: "You are so amazing 💚 awesome job!!!"

:) thanks!!! <3